Descendants of Edward Ketchum


William LLOYD.William married Ester Jane KETCHUM on 23 Oct 1856 in Blount Co., AL.

Ester Jane KETCHUM [Parents] was born on 4 May 1837. She married William LLOYD on 23 Oct 1856 in Blount Co., AL.


Aquilla Jefferson KETCHUM [Parents] was born on 4 Sep 1842 in Blountsville, AL. He died on 20 Feb 1921 in Oneonta, AL. He married Mary Amanda Humphries YEILDING on 11 Feb 1872 in Blount County, Alabama.

Other marriages:
GREEN, Nettie

A hand made book called: "Records of Confederate Veterans Alive 1924-26" Compiled by the Oneonta Chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy, by Vallie Walton Miles.

AQUILLA KETCHUM was born Sept 4, 1842, Blountsville, Al. He married Feb (Jan?) 11, 1872, Miss Mary A. Yielding and married May 2, 1916, Mrs. Nettie Green. He says: "No children of my own, but adopted 5 stepchildren: John H. Yielding Ketchum, Hannah Yielding Ketchum, Kimbrel Kinlock Ketchum, Martha Ann Kinlock Ketchum, George Yielding (who would not take the Ketchum name. I adopted the son of George Yielding: Lawrence Rosseau Yielding. Mrs. Green had four girls and one boy.

First entered the service as a private April 1861 at Blountsville, Alabama in Captain James H. Skinner's Company K of the 19th Alabama Infantry Regiment; continued service until 26 Apr 1865 at Greensboro, North Carolina. Flesh wound in leg at Chicamauga. Was in battle Franklin, Tn, Shiloh, Received wounds to leg and stomach at Chicamauga.

After the war returned to Blountsville and was Chief Clerk under Judge Moore from 1872-1880, Circuit Clerk 1880-1886, Chief Clerk under Judge Davidson 1842-1904, was register in chancery court, except about two years, from 1886 to 1921. Also was Justice of the Peace 1886-1921.Aquilla died Feb 20, 1921, Oneonta, Al.
Source: Melba Lowe......lowed@otelco.net

Mary Amanda Humphries YEILDING.Mary married Aquilla Jefferson KETCHUM on 11 Feb 1872 in Blount County, Alabama.

Mary Amanda Humphries Yeilding married Acquilla J. Ketchum, on 11 February 1872 at the "house of the Bride" by J. W. Moore, Probate Judge: Blount County Alabama Marriages Records 1871-1877, Volume A., page 44.

They had the following children:

  M i George McPherson YEILDING was born in 1859. He was related to his parents by adoption.

George Yeilding did not take the Ketchum name when his siblings were adopted by Aquilla Ketchum, but apparently Aquilla adopted Georges son, Lawrence Rosseau Yeilding later.
  M ii John H. KETCHUM was born in Feb 1861.
  F iii Hannah I. "Hettie" KETCHUM was born in Dec 1863. She was related to her parents by adoption.
  M iv Franklin Faulkner KETCHUM was born calculated 1864. He was related to his parents by adoption.
  F v Martha A. KETCHUM was born in 1868. She was related to her parents by adoption.

Aquilla Jefferson KETCHUM [Parents] was born on 4 Sep 1842 in Blountsville, AL. He died on 20 Feb 1921 in Oneonta, AL. He married Nettie GREEN on 2 May 1916 in Blount County, AL.

Other marriages:
YEILDING, Mary Amanda Humphries

A hand made book called: "Records of Confederate Veterans Alive 1924-26" Compiled by the Oneonta Chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy, by Vallie Walton Miles.

AQUILLA KETCHUM was born Sept 4, 1842, Blountsville, Al. He married Feb (Jan?) 11, 1872, Miss Mary A. Yielding and married May 2, 1916, Mrs. Nettie Green. He says: "No children of my own, but adopted 5 stepchildren: John H. Yielding Ketchum, Hannah Yielding Ketchum, Kimbrel Kinlock Ketchum, Martha Ann Kinlock Ketchum, George Yielding (who would not take the Ketchum name. I adopted the son of George Yielding: Lawrence Rosseau Yielding. Mrs. Green had four girls and one boy.

First entered the service as a private April 1861 at Blountsville, Alabama in Captain James H. Skinner's Company K of the 19th Alabama Infantry Regiment; continued service until 26 Apr 1865 at Greensboro, North Carolina. Flesh wound in leg at Chicamauga. Was in battle Franklin, Tn, Shiloh, Received wounds to leg and stomach at Chicamauga.

After the war returned to Blountsville and was Chief Clerk under Judge Moore from 1872-1880, Circuit Clerk 1880-1886, Chief Clerk under Judge Davidson 1842-1904, was register in chancery court, except about two years, from 1886 to 1921. Also was Justice of the Peace 1886-1921.Aquilla died Feb 20, 1921, Oneonta, Al.
Source: Melba Lowe......lowed@otelco.net

Nettie GREEN.Nettie married Aquilla Jefferson KETCHUM on 2 May 1916 in Blount County, AL.

Nettie Green had five children, four girls and one boy.


A. Jackson VANHORN was born in 1843 in Georgia. He married Sarah Adaline KETCHUM on 1 Mar 1866 in Blount Co., AL.

US Census 15 June 1870 - Place: East Half, Blount County, Alabama
Name Age
Jackson Vanhorn 27
S A Vanhorn 24 Sarah Ketchum
L K E Ketcham 5 [James' child?]
James Ketcham 30 [Sarah's brother James ?]
A D Ketcham 25 [Sarah's brother Daniel ?]
L F Ketcham 20 [Sarah's brother Lewis ?]
F L K Vanhorn 3/12

Sarah Adaline KETCHUM [Parents] was born on 20 Sep 1845 in Alabama. She married A. Jackson VANHORN on 1 Mar 1866 in Blount Co., AL.

Married Jackson Vanhorn.


John Wesley SMITH [image] was born on 25 Feb 1847 in Limestone Co., Alabama. He died on 20 Dec 1918 in San Saba, TX. He was buried in China Creek Cemetery, San Saba, Texas. He married Elizabeth KETCHUM on 6 May 1867.

Family comprised of John, wife Elizabeth and T. Catherine age 2 was 'raising cattle' in San Saba county with real and personal property of $2,933 when 1870 census was enumerated. A carpenter named A. C. Reed, age 38, with real and personal property valued at $757 was living with the family. At time of 1880 census the family, now including five children and one male servant from Tennessee named Henry Willis, was living in Precinct 4, San Saba County, Texas. Also in San Saba for the 1900 census with five of their children - Green Berry, Olis Fay, Edgar Clarence, Betty B., John Wesley, Jr.

American Life Histories: Manuscripts from the Federal Writers' Project, 1936-1940, interview (part) with J. A. Joiner - "John Smith, who was a relative of the Jackson family and lived at San Saba, told me that all of the Jackson family was killed by the Indians except two children that were captured and carried away. The Indians had gone about one hundred miles and camped where the children had escaped by some means and had started home. The men had formed a searching party and met the children as they were well on their way home. John Smith (of the search party) was a brother-in-law of the notorious Ketchums, of the San Saba and later of the San Angelo sections."

John Wesley Smith was involved as a witness in an important trial that helped to clean up the lawlessness of the vigilante gangs and the San Saba Mob overrunning San Saba County in the 30 years after the Civil War.

One murder and trial that started the decline of the mob was a bushwhacking and murder on July 19, 1889 of an elderly man named James Turner, a farmer and postmaster in Knob Ridge community, one morning while he was working in his field. Turner had been warned to get out of town about two or three months earlier because he had talked to his neighbor, James Daugherty about his dislike of the mob actions, and his belief that William Ford, a deputy sheriff, was a member of the mob. Daugherty then told Ford.

Family members of the murdered farmer testified that they had seen the murder, and murderers, and named Ford and George Trowbridge, along with John Harris who was never charged. Texas Rangers turned over their records to the District Attorney. The case against the two men was moved to Austin, and trial began in February, 1897, eventually ending with a hung jury. Second trial started June 14, 1897 ended in a hung jury. Charges were eventually dropped, but the trial had a lot of publicity and helped to hasten the end of the mobs control.

SMITH, JOHN W. testified in the first FORD and TROWBRIDGE trials for the state. He was in the cattle business with CUNNINGHAM and was told to leave by the Mob. Recognized the voice of AARON MEEKS at the time. He received a threatening letter from DICK SULLIVAN, telling him to "spool his wires" and leave the county. He may be the SMITH mentioned in the Texas court of Criminal Appeals record of the BILL OGLE case.* NOTE: The reference to spooling his wires revealing that the vigilantes were trying to stop fencing of the 'free range' or possibly trying to get rid of sheep men in the county?

*A while after the killing of James Turner, Jim Brown was murdered on his way home from church in the China Creek community. Bill Ogle, suspected leader of the mob, was arrested on August 26, 1897, by Ranger Ed Neal, and his trial in Llano county sent him to prison for life and helped Ranger Captain McDonald and his special ranger unit to finally succeed in bringing an end to mob violence.

Excerpts below from:
SEE NO EVIL, SPEAK NO EVIL by Ross McSwain and
THE TEXAS RANGERS AND THE SAN SABA MOB by Ross J. Cox
A few years after the Civil War a large part of Central Texas was partially, to almost completely controlled by vigilante mobs. Settlements were scattered. There were very few lawmen and very few jails, but many army deserters, thieves, robbers and murderers. Many Texas counties, including San Saba, Coryell, Hamilton, Lampasas McCulloch, Brown, Llano and others had to contend with terrorist actions of the mobs. Many of these secret vigilante groups were ranchers who started out to counter the outlawry, and to enforce laws that were not enforced by officers of the state. In the end, most of the mobs and vigilante gangs were all acting under the same unlawful rules. The ranchers began to run off the little operators who strung barbed wire, or too run innocent people out of the area with violence. Eventually everybody was afraid to talk. Nobody knew who was a mob member and who was not. Silence was golden. If you were an innocent citizen who talked about or revealed a mob member's name or an unlawful deed, you were at real risk of assassination. The same rule applied even to mob members. Talk, and you are either killed or your house burned or, maybe, given a three days to get out of the county permanently. If you were told to perjure yourself for the sake of a gang member, you did as told. If you were told to assassinate someone, you obeyed or left the area fast and permanently to avoid retribution.

In 1869-1870 a study was conducted that revealed that 939 murders were committed in one three year period. That number was later revised to 1,035. And from 1865 to 1871 sheriff's reports revealed that 4,425 crimes were committed, with fewer than 600 arrests and very few convictions. Almost everyone was intimidated to a point of refusing to testify against a suspect. Texas Ranger W.J.L. Sullivan reported to his Austin officers at one time that the sheriffs of both San Saba and Mills Counties were members of the mob. This went on until late 1890s before the mobs began to weaken.

It seems that shortly after the 1900 census the Smith family moved to San Angelo, Tom Green County for a while. Perhaps because the infamous San Saba Mob of vigilantes somewhat active?

San Angelo Standard [newspaper]
14 Sept 1901 E. R. Byler is expected to sell his property to Mr. Smith of San Saba County.

21 Sep 1901 J. W. Smith of Knickerbocker is recorded as booking in at the Landon Hotel in San Angelo. Elsewhere in the same issue the paper notes that Elliot Byler who was about to leave for Arizona, had "sold his house and garden to J. W. Smith".

Ross J. Cox Sr's book, "The Texas Rangers and the San Saba Mob" has this to say from trial testimony excerpts:
26 Feb. 1897 - Austin Daily Statesman, San Saba Murder Trial, p33 - Defendant questions witness: … "acompainied the mob to Smith's house and warned him ..must dissolve his partnership with Cunningham or leave.
Cross Exam by Mr. Burleson : "Mr Sullivan didn't you write a letter to a Mr. (John W.) Smith tell him he had spool his wires and get out of the country?"
p.34 - Mr Nolan cross exam by Burleson: "Were you not a member of the mob that ordered Smith and Cunningham to dissolve partner ship?"
10 June 1897 - p.47 - Mr John Smith For the state, living in San Saba 1889… Did they (mob) ever visit your home? "Yes, Sir. One nite abaout 20 or 25 men rode up to my house and the front one asked "if you don't stop cow stealing we will break your d...d neck. One said "Johnny, we are telling you this for your own good." Burleson asked "did you recognize the voice…reply "No sir but my children said.." [objected to and sustained]. Witness finally said afterwards that "he heard the voice and recognized it"

Elizabeth KETCHUM [Parents] [image] was born on 20 Mar 1848 in Illinois. She died on 6 Jun 1932 in San Saba, TX. The cause of death was a heart attack. She was buried in China Creek Cemetery, San Saba, Texas. She married John Wesley SMITH on 6 May 1867.

They had the following children:

  F i Temperance Katherine SMITH was born on 9 May 1868. She died on 21 Jul 1948.
  M ii Benjamin F. SMITH "Banner" was born in 1870. He died in 1870. He was buried in China Creek Cemetery, San Saba County, Texas.

Died as an infant.
  M iii Lee Wilson SMITH was born on 29 Jul 1871. He died on 20 Jan 1947.
  M iv Patrick M. SMITH was born on 22 Oct 1873. He died on 17 Feb 1930.
  F v Annie May SMITH was born on 15 Jan 1876.
  M vi Green Berry SMITH was born on 23 May 1878. He died on 12 Sep 1947.
  F vii Olis Fay SMITH was born on 14 Nov 1881. She died on 30 Dec 1881.

Died as an infant.
  M viii Ike W. SMITH was born on 23 Nov 1882. He died on 30 Sep 1883.

Died as an infant.
  F ix Inez Faye SMITH was born on 12 Aug 1884. She died on 31 Dec 1955.
  M x Edgar Clarence SMITH was born on 5 Jan 1886. He died on 17 Oct 1971.
  F xi Betty B. SMITH was born on 16 Jun 1888.
  M xii John Wesley SMITH Jr. was born on 30 Dec 1891. He died on 11 Sep 1928.

Died in an auto (or motorcycle?) accident in San Saba, Texas.

Green Berry KETCHUM Jr. [Parents] [image] was born on 24 Oct 1850 in Caldwell Co., Texas. He died on 31 Mar 1914 in Tom Green County, Texas. He was buried in Fairmont Cemetery, San Angelo, TX. He married Barsha Ola SHIELDS on 23 May 1889. Green was employed as Rancher.

THE CALL OF THE SAN SABA by Alma Ward Hamrick
"One of the pupils attending school at the Masonic school was Berry Ketchum."

In 1870's Green Berry's nephew George Ketchum (son of James) moved to Tom Green county, Texas several miles south and slightly west of Knickerbocker, Texas. By 1880 Green Berry was living in the county also. In late 1884 Green Berry moved his ranch to the same place. He prospered, and in about 1900 he bought a ranch 9 miles west of Sheffield, Pecos County, Texas. The ranch was several thousand acres of land. He was known to raise and sell good quality race horses and working horses. After his death a large oil/gas field was discovered on the land and the family was said to have became even more prosperous. The ranch location included land described as Abstract #5170 - Survey 34 TCRR A2- Pecos county, Texas as well as Abstracts 5154, 5170, 5171, 5389, 5521, 6256, 6348, 6349, 6420, 6421, 6422, 6508, 6509, 6510, 6511, 6589, 6590, 6591, 6592, 6595, 6692, 6806, 6807, 7208, 9259, 9260, 9261 as well as land in Terrell County, Texas described as Abstracts 637, 638, 1289, 1335, 1336, 1585, 1586, 1587, 1588, 1590, 1591, 1592, 1593, 1594, 1595, 1596, 1597, 1610, 1611, 1614, 1615, 1616, 1640, 1659, 1668, 1669, 1839, 1840, 1857, 1858, 1859, 2240, 2920, 2921, 2922, 2924 and also land in other adjacent counties.

1880 census, Precinct 3, Tom Green County, Texas: John McDannel, age 33, his cousin John Adcock, age 24, both born in Arkansas, and Green Berry Ketchum, age 29, his partner were living in same household. McCannel and Green Berry listed themselves as stock raisers. Adcock listed as farmer.

1900 U.S. Census, the Berry Ketchum family lived in Commissioner's Precinct 4, Tom Green County, Texas. Also living with them was cousin Thomas Ketchum, son of his uncle Chester, his mother-in-law Matilda (Shields) age 70 and Claburn Wilson, a servant.

Ozona (TX) Optimist newspaper, Thursday February 2, 1913 - "Berry Ketchum came in from San Angelo with his new car, accompanied by his two daughters, Misses Alice and Barsha."

The San Saba County News 02/16/1916 reported the sale of Berry's ranch along the Pecos River on 02/04/1916. "W.N. Waddell of Fort Worth to Blackstone & Slaughter of Irion County. $330,000. Included 140 sections of land, 4,000 sheep, 4,000 mixed cattle and 200 horses and mules." NOTE: 140 sections = 89,600 acres. $330,000 equals about $6,500,000 in 2009 purchasing power.
In 1901, Frank Hamer and his brother Harrison moved to Sheffield, Texas. They had been hired as wranglers on the Pecos Ranch of Berry Ketchum. The Hamer brothers were still working on the ranch on April 26, 1901 when Berry's brother "Black Jack" was hung in Clayton, NM. Harrison and Frank Hamer went on to be famous Texas Rangers. Though best known as the man who tracked and killed the infamous Bonnie and Clyde, Frank Hamer accomplished much more than this one crime indicates. He is the man that many believe to be the greatest Texas Ranger of the first half of the twentieth century. Years later the great granddaughter of Berry's sister Elizabeth Ketchum Smith married Harrison Flavis Hamer, great grandson of Texas Ranger Harrison Hamer.

Barsha Ola SHIELDS [image] was born on 25 Jul 1869 in Williamson Co., Texas. She died on 17 Feb 1937 in San Angelo, Texas. She married Green Berry KETCHUM Jr. on 23 May 1889.

Sister of Clara Louise Shields who married Henry Ketchum, son of Dr. Nicholas Ketchum (who was no apparent kin to Barsha's husband's Ketchums in San Saba).

Barsha Ola SHIELDS who married Green Berry Ketchum in my maternal family, and Martha Louise RUTHERFORD who married Augustave SPRADLEY in my paternal family, were 3rd cousins 1 time removed. Their common ancestors were Joseph RUTHERFORD and Elizabeth ELLIOTT. They lived in different places and probably never knew each other. -- Berry Spradley

They had the following children:

  F i Nora Blake KETCHUM was born on 2 May 1891.
  F ii Alice Doty KETCHUM was born on 11 Mar 1893.
  F iii Barsha Green KETCHUM was born on 31 Jan 1897. She died on 8 Jun 1973.

Samuel Wesley KETCHUM [Parents] [image] was born on 4 Jan 1854 in Caldwell Co, Texas. He died on 24 Jul 1899 in New Mexico Territory. The cause of death was a gunshot wound. He was buried in Oddfellows Cemetery-Santa Fe, NM. He married Louisa J. GREENLEE on 4 Feb 1875 in San Saba Co., Texas. Samuel was employed as a ranch hand and outlaw.

Died in the New Mexico Territorial Prison at age 45, about 2 weeks after being shot and captured during a gun battle with a sheriff's posse which was chasing them after they robbed a Colorado and Southern passenger train at Folsom, New Mexico. Once before at Twin Mountain near Des Moines, NM the same southbound Denver-Fort Worth Express of the Colorado & Southern railroad had been robbed by Sam and brother Thomas 'Black Jack' Ketchum and others of their gang including William Ellsworth Lay alias William McGuinnes, William Carver alias G.W. Franks and William "Broncho Bill" Walters. Some historians say it was Kid Curry rather than Bronco Bill on the robbery. (William R. Carver was born in Wilson County, Texas, to George Alfred and Martha Jane (Rigsby) Carver. Will’s older sister was Frances Emeline Carver, born in Comanche County, Texas, on January 9, 1866. Will worked for the Sixes Ranch, also known as the T Half Circle, near the town of Sonora, Sutton County, Texas. George and Ben Kilpatrick, Tom and Sam Ketchum, and members of the Byler family from Tom Green County, Texas also worked there. On February 9, 1892 Will Carver married 17-year-old Viana Byler in San Angelo, Texas. She died of pregnancy complications on July 22, 1892, and is buried in the family cemetery plot at Dove Creek, Texas. Kid Curry was born Harvey Alexander Logan in Iowa in 1867. When his mother died in 1876, Harvey went to live with his Aunt Lee in Dodson, Missouri. Until at least 1883, Harvey was making an honest living breaking horses for the Cross L outfit near Big Spring, Texas.)

A second holdup attempt was made July 16,1899 without 'Black Jack' in attendance for some reason. After the robbery, Sam and the others (Will Carver and William Ellsworth "Elzy" Lay) headed for the mountains southwest of Raton, NM where they had a hideout in Turkey Creek Canyon above Cimarron village. The next day a posse consisting of Sheriff Ed Farr of Huerfano Co., Colorado, special Agent W.H. Reno of the Colorado & Southern RR, and five deputies found their trail and tracked them into the Canyon where Sam was wounded, along with two of the deputies. Deputys W.H. Love and Tom Smith were killed and Sheriff Farr was also killed. Sam made his escape, but was found a few days later by Reno at the home of a rancher, where he was arrested. He was taken to Santa Fe Territorial Prison where he died from the wounds. He was buried in the Odd Fellows Cemetery, now the Fairview Cemetery on Cerritos Rd. in Santa Fe. "Elzy" or "Elza" (William Ellsworth) Lay was born November 25th 1868, Mt Pleasant, Ohio. Elzy had come out west to Denver, and became an outlaw after mistakenly believing he had killed a man. Jailed for life after the killing of Sheriff Farr after the Folsom robbery, he was released in 1906. He returned to Alma, NM and lived there for two years. He stayed with Louis and Walter Jones, who in 1904 had built a large merchandise store at Alma. Elzy died aged 65 in Los Angeles, November 10th 1934.

I spoke with a lady who was about 75 years of age in 1969 and who was from San Saba and a distant cousin of the Ketchum family. She said that her people always said that Sam Ketchum was a 'good man' who left San Saba to find his brother and got caught up by the "easy money" stories of the gang. Another source said that, to the best of her recollection, she had heard that Sam was never a crook or outlaw before going to find his brother, but that he was always away from home working on ranches in New Mexico and the Panhandle area of Texas, and Louisa was left alone with the two children. It was during the time of much unrest and many depredations and raids by the Indians in San Saba and along many other frontier Texas locations, and she was afraid and without protection too often, so she left Sam about 1880. Ironically, before Sam became an outlaw, he served a short enlistment in the Texas Ranger's Minute Men, Company N, under the command of Wm. H. Ledbetter in the Fall of 1872 to protect the San Saba citizens against outbreaks of indian raids. RANGER MUSTER ROLLS.

Thomas Green Chaney, San Angelo, Texas, interviewed, January 20, 1938 (written by the staff of the Folklore Project of the Federal Writers' Project for the U.S. Works Progress (later Work Projects) Administration (WPA) from 1936-1940). The Library of Congress collection includes 2,900 documents representing the work of over 300 writers from 24 states. See http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/wpaintro/exhome.html Below is a transcription of part of the interview with Mr. Chaney by Ruby Mosley.

"Outlaws and gun men, I guess I knew 'em about as well as anyone to not have been one myself----Sam Ketchum, Tom Ketchum, Will Carver, Kilpatrick and my own brother W. H. Chaney and his brother-in-law Frank Stedham.

"My brother W. H. Chaney lived in Schleicher County near the county line, between Eldorado and Christoval. His home was a hideout for all the boys. I lived about a quarter of a mile from him but never got mixed up in the bunch. I had a family and we never suspected the outlaws being harbored so near us. "I know the Ketchum boys in the San Saba county, and later in the Christoval section. Sam Ketchum was a mighty good man to die an outlaw. He was a very good friend of mine. He never would have been in to anything but got into trouble trying to save Tom." Author - Ruby Mosley - San Angelo, Texas.

SANTA FE NEWSPAPER*, July 27, 1899:
A SAD MISSION - THE BROTHER OF SAMUEL KETCHUM CAME TO ATTEND TO THE BURIAL
This morning G. W. Shield, sheriff of Tom Green county, Tex., and G. B. Ketchum of the same county, arrived at Santa Fe to attend to the burial of Samuel Ketchum, who died from the effect of a wound received at the hands of a posse of officers tracking the robbers who held up a train near Folsom recently. The scene when Mr. Ketchum first saw his brothers body was very affecting. Mr. Ketchum had neither seem nor heard from his brother for many years, and had hoped that perhaps the report of death was false after all. But when he saw the body he was convinced, and tears stood in the eye of the strong man. He was unwilling to speak upon the subject, and no information could be gathered from him in reference to the early life of the dead man. Mr. Ketchum is a highly respected and wealthy citizen of San Angelo, and the manner in which his brother met death was a terrible shock to him. The remains were embalmed some days ago by order of the brother of the dead man, and this afternoon Undertaker Wagner interred the body at Odd Fellows' cemetery. After attending to the funeral of his brother Mr. Ketchum and Sheriff Shield left for their home in Texas. *newspaper name not readable.

A letter by Phil Cooke of The Territorian in Santa Fe was printed in the Frontier Times, Vol 36, Fall, 1962 and said that "years ago when Cerrillos Road was widened by 13 feet the highway was built right over Sam's grave and today, those who travel on Cerrillos Road from Santa Fe to Albuquerque, as they pass the NM State Hwy Dept building, drive over the late Samuel Ketchum."

The above letter was not true. Berry Spradley has a note from Marian Meyer, now deceased, who was a historian, and the long time curator of Fairview Cemetery which abuts the Odd Fellows cemetery along Cerrillos Rd. She had this to say about the boundary of both cemeteries. "Phillip St. George Cooke wrote some very unreliable stuff and this is one piece. That fence is still where it was nearly 100 years ago. The widening of Cerrillos Road was in 1952. I well remember it. There was a wide stretch of dirt all along both cemeteries where people parked their cars and walked into the cemeteries." NOTE: the wide strip was taken for the road and is now a narrower shoulder, and no graves were covered by the highway.

It seems that Sam's exact burial site was not marked or recorded, but a small monument marker was placed inside Odd Fellows cemetery by his grandson Berry Spradley, near the adjoining corners of the two cemeteries out by the highway right of way in 1997.

Louisa J. GREENLEE [image] was born on 5 May 1859 in Arkansas. She died on 13 Oct 1943 in Ralls, Texas. She was buried in Ralls, Texas. She married Samuel Wesley KETCHUM on 4 Feb 1875 in San Saba Co., Texas.

Louisa took the two children and left Sam Ketchum before the June 2, 1880 census was recorded, when he was living with his sister Nancy and brother-in-law Abijah Duncan in San Saba. Laura eventually married John Lecompte. They were living in Johnson County, TX in 1900 census.

Louisa's father and mother were born in Missouri. Two of Louisa Greenlee's sisters married into the Till family. Bill Till married Duke Greenlee and Thomas Jefferson Till married Berneice Greenlee.

NOTE: John B. Ketchum (same name as Louisa's grandson) received a 640 acre bounty (file 188) in Johnson County, Abstract 484 August 30, 1845 (Texas General Land Office). Who was this John B. Ketchum? Was this a connection that led Louisa to Johnson County when she left San Saba County?

They had the following children:

  F i Laura KETCHUM was born on 24 Mar 1879. She died on 8 Dec 1960.
  M ii William Berry KETCHUM was born on 24 Nov 1876. He died on 7 Dec 1951.

Abijah Elam DUNCAN Jr. [image] "Bige" was born on 20 Nov 1856 in Freestone County, TX. He died before 1920. He married Nancy Blake KETCHUM on 11 Dec 1879.

U.S. Federal Census Non-Population (Agricultural) Schedules, 1850-1880 Record for Abijah Duncan. Precinct 9, San Saba County, taken in June, 1880 six months after his marriage to Nancy. Owned 130 acres, 92 acres of woodlands or forest, 38 acres tilled, including grass land or fallow land. Owned 25 horses. Value of land, fences, buildings was $400. Value of farming implements and machinery was $25. Value of livestock $470. Value of all farm production sold, consumed or on hand from 1879 was $150.

Nancy Blake KETCHUM [Parents] [image] was born on 6 Jan 1860 in San Saba, Texas. She died on 9 Jan 1937. She married Abijah Elam DUNCAN Jr. on 11 Dec 1879.

Living with her son Bawler Duncan and his family at time of 1930 U.S. census, in Precinct 4, Tom Green County, Texas.

They had the following children:

  F i Delia Green DUNCAN was born on 25 Oct 1881. She died on 25 Nov 1915.
  M ii Loys Boy DUNCAN was born on 5 Oct 1883. He died on 16 May 1960.
  M iii Cassander DUNCAN was born on 2 Aug 1885 in Texas. He died on 16 Aug 1887 in Christoval, Tom Green, Texas.
  M iv Tap DUNCAN was born on 6 Aug 1887 in Christoval, Tom Green, Texas. He died on 26 Feb 1889 in Christoval, Tom Green, Texas.
  M v Berry Ketchum DUNCAN was born on 19 Feb 1889. He died on 17 Dec 1962.
  F vi Ora Lee DUNCAN was born on 1 Mar 1891. She died on 11 Oct 1966.
  M vii Joseph Carl DUNCAN was born on 1 Sep 1892. He died in 1957.
  M viii Gus Thomas DUNCAN was born on 11 Sep 1896. He died on 31 May 1955.
  M ix Baller Abijah DUNCAN was born on 9 Aug 1898. He died on 2 Jul 1983.

J. L. HOWARD was born in Alabama. He died after 1877. He married Mary Elizabeth KETCHUM on 12 Mar 1868 in San Saba, Texas.

Given names of J. L. Howard may have been James Levi. Family lore said that he just left and never returned. It has been said that J. L. Howard was on the cattle drive with James Ketchum when they were killed by Kickapoo indians, but the five people killed have been correctly identified and he was not one of them. Also, his being killed on this drive is not possible because his marriage date of 1868 is correct and is after the massacre took place in December 1867.

Mary Elizabeth KETCHUM [Parents] was born about 1845 in Texas. She married J. L. HOWARD on 12 Mar 1868 in San Saba, Texas.

Other marriages:
CHENEY, William

Elizaeth with family in Guadalupe county Texas for 1850 census, age 5.

James Ketchum 26 (James R. Ketchum)
Mary Ketchum 24 (Mary Ellen Ray Ketchum)
Peter Ketchum 13
Elizabeth Ketchum 5
George Ketchum 2

Married J.L. Howard. Double wedding with sister Sarah. J.L. Howard supposedly went off on cattle drive, never returned or heard of again. If true, it was nevertheless not the cattle drive that his father in law was on when killed. Elizabeth and children were with her mother Mary Ellen in 1880 census in San Saba County, Precinct 5. Elizabeth's age on the census says 24. This is wrong and should be 34 or 35 judging by the 1850 census which says she was 5 at the time, and by analyzing the other dates (otherwise she would have been only 12 or 13 when married and 14 when James was born).

1880 census:
Mary E. Ketchum 54 head - born KY
Marlson Ketchum 20 son - born TX
Peter Ketchum 18 son - born TX
Van Buran Ketchum 15 son - born TX
Tomie Ketchum 12 son - born TX
Eliza Howard 24 daughter - born TX (census error - should say 34)
James Howard 10 grandson - born TX
Johnie Howard 6 grandson - born TX
Edward Howard 3 grandson - born TX

Elizabeth later married William Cheney.

They had the following children:

  M i James HOWARD was born in 1870 in Texas.

Middle name may have been Horace. May have died in Phoenix, AZ in 1952.
  M ii Johnny HOWARD was born in 1874. He died on 10 Feb 1952.
  M iii Edward HOWARD was born in 1877 in Texas.

William CHENEY.William married Mary Elizabeth KETCHUM after 1877.

Mary Elizabeth KETCHUM [Parents] was born about 1845 in Texas. She married William CHENEY after 1877.

Other marriages:
HOWARD, J. L.

Elizaeth with family in Guadalupe county Texas for 1850 census, age 5.

James Ketchum 26 (James R. Ketchum)
Mary Ketchum 24 (Mary Ellen Ray Ketchum)
Peter Ketchum 13
Elizabeth Ketchum 5
George Ketchum 2

Married J.L. Howard. Double wedding with sister Sarah. J.L. Howard supposedly went off on cattle drive, never returned or heard of again. If true, it was nevertheless not the cattle drive that his father in law was on when killed. Elizabeth and children were with her mother Mary Ellen in 1880 census in San Saba County, Precinct 5. Elizabeth's age on the census says 24. This is wrong and should be 34 or 35 judging by the 1850 census which says she was 5 at the time, and by analyzing the other dates (otherwise she would have been only 12 or 13 when married and 14 when James was born).

1880 census:
Mary E. Ketchum 54 head - born KY
Marlson Ketchum 20 son - born TX
Peter Ketchum 18 son - born TX
Van Buran Ketchum 15 son - born TX
Tomie Ketchum 12 son - born TX
Eliza Howard 24 daughter - born TX (census error - should say 34)
James Howard 10 grandson - born TX
Johnie Howard 6 grandson - born TX
Edward Howard 3 grandson - born TX

Elizabeth later married William Cheney.

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